Author Topic: Global Economy  (Read 246 times)

Caesar

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Global Economy
« on: November 03, 2019, 05:36:28 PM »
Found this today and thought it was interesting.
Would love to see comparable charts from 5/10  years ago

Kaitsu

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2019, 08:08:43 PM »
That is an interesting and clever presentation!

eddieb

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #2 on: November 04, 2019, 10:31:45 PM »
The beauty of it is in its simplicity.  A lot of information presented in a very clear an obvious way. Even the most illiterate could see which segments of the ball are larger than others.

Caesar

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #3 on: March 25, 2020, 07:51:59 PM »
Most European markets finished up today.
The FTSE gained 4% and now looks set to go for 5700, a level not reached since 13th March.
German DAX followed yesterdays 11% jump with another 1%.

In the US 1-month and 3-month yields turned negative – it’s the first time we have seen negative rates in the US, although of course fed funds rates remain positive. The Federal Reserve’s massive dose of stimulus and unlimited QE has crushed yields at the short end of the curve.

Tomorrows US jobless figures will likely prove to be market-movers one way or the other. Usually in the thousands, there are fears it could be in the millions this week due to the government shutdown. Consensus suggests a 1.5m print – way ahead of the usual numbers which trend about 200k week to week. Morgan Stanley has estimated in excess of 3m. Last week’s print rose to 281k from 211k a week before but the real impact of the coronavirus is to hit.
In Canada, according to Justin Trudeau, a million Canadians applied for jobless benefits last week – extrapolate that to the US and we could be in for true shocker of a print tomorrow.

Caesar

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2020, 01:17:36 PM »
Wow!
The latest US unemployment numbers were predicted to be catastrophic.

The actual total, 3.3 million, turned out to be even worse than expected.

The record-breaking amount reflects a US economy put into deep-freeze almost overnight. The government-ordered shutdown hasn’t just shuttered businesses temporarily, it has vapourised the jobs of millions of Americans – many of whom are the particularly vulnerable hourly service workers who live paycheque to paycheque.

Caesar

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2020, 01:51:59 PM »
After yesterdays rises across the globe,  it didn't come as muvhvof a surprise to see prices falling back today as traders take some profits ahead of the weekend.

Things are clearly stabilising,  but there are still questions to be answered plus we don't know how long or how deep this virus will continue.

Still a bumpy road ahead for the foreseeable future

Caesar

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Re: Global Economy
« Reply #6 on: Today at 08:29:45 PM »
Beginning to think that, when we finally come out of this situation, it is going to be a different world to before.
Working from home seems to be working out fairly smoothing for many, especially former office workers.  As IT departments find more efficient ways of using this technology and, perhaps more importantly for employers, find better ways to monitor employees work behaviour, the potential savings in office space and associated costs might mean an end to travelling to the office every day for many.
This in turn would have repercussions for transport providers facing reduced transport use, garages selling less fuel, even sandwich shops and restaurants having fewer lunchtime customers.

Cinemas may close as customers who have signed up to streaming services no longer visit them, preferring to maximise their subscriptions instead.

Its a virtual certainty that many industries will see mass consolidation,  resulting in less choice for consumers.  Airlines and cruise lines spring to mind.

There will be new opportunities,  possibly disruptors even, who benefit and we have to hope that this turns out to be a watershed that changes society,  ultimately,  for the better.